Volare

image/photo

A number of you have asked to see a photo of the Dreamliner in flight with the gear up. Here’s a great one.

In addition, take a look at the highlights video (below) we’ve put together of the 787’s first flight - from takeoff at chilly Paine Field to landing at rainy Boeing Field.

image/photo

Click on the image to view the 787 Dreamliner First Flight video.

Comments (16)

alexandar (oakland):

She surely looks spectacular!

I love the landing part - it is so steady.

When can we expect to see 787s flying in formation?

Jeff (Las Vegas):

Congratulations. Great pictures & video. The entire Boeing Team should be proud. Suggestion would be to post video's using quicktime for some of us that use mac's.

Andrew Boydston (Caldwell, ID):

Thank you so much for the picture of "wheels up" it will now be wallpaper for my computer. Once again, congratulations to you and everyone associated with the project.

Boeing gave me my life back (the one) that I lost during the time I was obsessing for this day.

Adolfo (Hong Kong):

Great pics. When can we see RTO tests (rejected take offs) tests?

The RTO test video of the B777 is impressive (with brakes burning). I am excited with this plane.

Todd Cohen (Philadelphia):

I have waited along with so many others for this day! Congratulations to EVERYONE at Boeing! What a beautiful sight - worth spending the entire day in front of the my PC! This is a very moving and inspiring experience.

Milena (Brazil):

Congratulations for the Dreamliner's first flight!

Farzin Shadpour (Toulouse, France):

Hi Randy.

Here in Toulouse, the home of Airbus, one of the things everyone was impressed by was the Boeing paint Design! From Marketing standpoint I think it will be a good investment to take the other 5 test aircraft back in the paint hanger and paint them Boeing colors.
Please consider this and discuss it with the program leaders.

Kris Sahabu (Everett, Washington):

I am failing to see the relation between the picture above and the singing of Volare by Domenico Modugno from that link.

The song is in Italian (I'm guessing) and since I can only wish I know Italian, I am wondering if that is some kind of subliminal message to our friends in Europe. Am I close?

-----------

Hi Kris,

Nothing subliminal about it. "Volare" is a famous Italian song about flying. Volare means "to fly" in Italian. We're celebrating the first flight of the 787 Dreamliner, and we often make musical references here in the Journal!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volare_(song)

-- Randy Tinseth

Ron B (Mesa, AZ, USA):

Randy, I hope that you were able to read the post the other day sent in by
Ludo Van Vooren (Reston, VA, USA):
You should capitalize on this to inspire new generations to join Aerospace and share these dreams. Here are four suggestions: http://ow.ly/MKkt

I have read the news clip presented by Ludo and his suggestions, and found them interesting and exciting that I would hope that the Boeing Co. would be encouraged to consider adopting the suggestions for inspiring the younger people that are into using the newer video and data technology to keep up with events happening in their generation. I am sure that the Boeing Co. have such experts and would be able to implement the suggestions for keeping the young now generation interested in the 787 flight testing program and all other aerospace programs with the intent of leading those with dreams and turning them into reality working for the Boeing company.

Patrick ((El Segundo S&IS)):

Awesome!
In the video there appears to be a drogue attached to the tip of the vertical stabilizer; is this part of the test equipment?

Keep up the GREAT work.

------

Patrick,

As I mentioned to Ron B. in the comments to the previous post, that object you noticed is a trailing cone. This provides an independent source of air data during flight test in order to calculate speed and altitude.

-- Randy Tinseth

Amy (Houston, TX):

Many thanks for sharing the video! We couldn't seem to get it to come up here, and a couple of us ended up watching it on the Houston Chronicle's website where they had a live video feed from the Associated Press (AP). We were quite happy to see the takeoff. We missed the landing, but now that it's on video, we can.

Somoene also sent around a PDF copy of the "Airworthiness Experimental Certification" ticket on Monday. We took that as a good sign.

Thanks again!

Kevin (Los Angeles, CA):

The weather conditions that shortened the first flight by ~1 hour actually give a mystic touch to this historic event.

(Seattle, WA, USA):

Explanation of Italian musical bonanza "Volare" and its resonance with the amazing debutante flight of the lady bird made perfect sense, indeed!

She flew through a max. height of 15,000 ft above the planet earth at a max. speed of 333 km/hr. The numbers are symphonic as well. It's just the beginning of a journey. Take a hike and soar through the simplest airplane designed from keyboard characters:

__|__
'---o--(_)--o---'

Norman (Long Beach, California, United States):

Nice shot of the 787 with the wheels up. I could not see the 787 land live because I was at school doing my "finals" but the landing looked spectacular in the video.

Andrew (Spokane, USA):

The link to the video http://videowm.boeing.com/autopost/bca/787_First_Flight_300.asx seems broken, I get a "server not found" error.

---

Andrew,

Thank you for pointing that out. The link is now fixed and you should be able to view the video.

-- Randy Tinseth

April:

Wow, awesome photo! Looks like a blue bird in flight. Technology sure has come a long way!!! Such a magnificent plane...I always love take-offs than touch downs. Interesting blog...

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