Mr. 1K

When we celebrated the 1,000th 777 earlier this month, there was another milestone that didn’t get much attention. But when I heard the story behind it, I had to share it with you.

Boeing employee Dick Bender seems to have special relationship with the number 1,000. His job is to sign the certificate of airworthiness on our airplanes. He did just that for the 1,000th 777—as well as the 1,000th 747 in 1993 and the 1,000th 767 in 2011.

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Here’s Dick posing next to the 1,000th 777 for Emirates.

Bender joined Boeing in 1957 and guesses that he’s signed the final delivery document for a couple hundred airplanes. When his co-workers discovered that he’d signed for the 1,000th 747, they gave him the honor of signing the 1,000th 767’s final paperwork. So it was only fitting that he sign the 1,000th 777 paperwork too.

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Congratulations to Dick for being a part of Boeing history three times.

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Rollout of the 1000th 767 - February 2011.

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The 1000th 747 delivered to Singapore Airlines in October of 1993. Photo courtesy Singapore Airlines.

Comments (6)

Harold (Tulsa):

Great photo of the B747. What a beauty she was.

Tom (Germany):

Randy,
you wrote that Mr. Dick Bender jointed Boeing in 1957! Thus he is with Boeing (or working) for 55 years? Should it read 1975?

Remarks to Chile: Airbus and Boeing: Nose to Nose - now nose against nose at the WTO!

Randy Tinseth:

Hi Tom,

That was no typo. Dick joined Boeing in March 1957 and, with a couple of breaks in service, has completed 47 years with the company.

Pamela Holland (Daleville, Alanama USA):

This is a awesome milestone. I would like to say congrats. I am just now finishing A n P school and hope to find a career just as Mr. Bender has.

Norman (Long Beach, CA):

Though the 767 line made it's 1,000th unit in a span of 30 years and the 777 in a span of 18 years I can imagine the 787 line making the thousandth unit in far less time than the 777.

Tom (Germany):

Hi Randy,
thanks for the answer!
Then Dick must belong to the oldest employees with Boeing - and is still up to date in the business!

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