787 test flights

Our fifth 787 test airplane, ZA005, has been pretty busy the past few days. On Saturday and again today, the airplane left Boeing Field and took to the skies for test flights. (Photos by Marian Lockhart and Jim Anderson)

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ZA005 takes off from Boeing Field today.

Saturday’s flight lasted 2 hours and 19 minutes with the crew using special equipment to monitor the main and APU batteries. Today’s flight lasted one hour and 30 minutes and used the same monitoring. The pilots reported that both flights were uneventful.

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ZA005 in flight today.

This completes the first round of battery monitoring tests. The purpose was to monitor the in-flight performance of the batteries, which provides data that could support the continuing investigations in the recent incidents. No additional flights are currently scheduled for ZA005.

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ZA005 lands at Boeing Field today after completing a flight test.

Capt. Randy Neville and Capt. Mike Bryan, plus 11 flight test personnel, were aboard both flights. The airplane flew primarily over eastern Washington— barely touching northern Oregon— on both days.

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Capt. Randy Neville (front) and Capt. Mike Bryan (middle) after landing today.

While we can’t share more details at this point, I can tell you that our team continues to put in long hours to solve the issue as quickly as possible.

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ZA005 after landing at Boeing Field today.

Comments (2)

Miles Janzen (Calgary, Canada):

I have always been a fan of Boeing aircraft, and I know you will get this figured out soon, was just a thought, but could it be anything to do with repeated pressurization cycles on the batteries, unless these avionics bays are un-pressurized, as it had me thinking, all the planes I work on the batteries are not in a pressurized area.
Again good luck and keep designing great aircraft.

Norman (Long Beach. CA):

It is a good start to finally get to the problem of the battery and other things that have dogged the 787. The new test flights and the lack of cancellation of orders is great news for the 787 line and I know it wont be long until the 787 will be flying again with passengers and with new orders.

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