When the going gets tough, Boeing's talent gets going

Today, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board issued another update on the 787 incident in Boston. As we continue to assist in the investigation, I wanted to take this opportunity to share some of the specific things we’re doing to meet this challenge.

At Boeing we all have the same goal: develop the world’s safest, most advanced airplanes. When we need to focus on an issue like the one surrounding the 787, we do it with passion, diligence and precision.

When the events occurred, the 787 engineering team immediately got to work analyzing data sent from the airplanes to the company’s 24-hour monitoring system in Everett. As details emerged, experts from around the company convened to review relevant systems.

In the earliest hours, program teams mobilized to provide support on a number of fronts. Crews were dispatched to the site of the events in the U.S. and Japan to support the investigations as requested by authorities.

image/photo

Boeing engineers examine a 787 battery.

We now have hundreds of people at Boeing, some of our best and brightest, dedicated exclusively to solving this issue. In addition, we’ve tapped into the pool of Technical Fellows at Boeing, which offers deep knowledge across diverse technical areas. These individuals achieve this coveted designation after demonstrating expertise recognized by leaders in Boeing, as well as across the industry.

We’ve also reached out to a handful of retired experts. Seven retired executives and technology leaders make up our Senior Advisory Group, which provides valuable experience-based perspective and counsel to teams designing and manufacturing. Together they have more than 230 years of collective Boeing experience and have been awarded a total of 46 industry awards and accolades.

So while you don’t see what’s happening behind closed doors and we can’t always share every detail, I can assure you that we’re actively working around the clock with federal regulators to get the 787s back in the air. We owe it to our customers—and I thank everyone involved for their tireless efforts.

Comments (9)

matjamca (UK):

I can't wait to see this beautiful plane back in the skies, but can't help but feel concerned that this may be a long while off. It seems to be a very complex problem. I just hope and pray Boeing do the right thing and keep her on the ground until they are absolutely sure the problem is resolved.

I wish all the engineers working hard to fix her every success in identifying what went wrong so your new baby can stretch her wings and fly again soon.

Thiagarajan K Rengasamy (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia):

The 787 development has brought in process improvement in the operational of a plane. I am sure with the Boeing's collective experience the issue will be identified and rectified.

Herve (www.nosite.com):

What a plane. Hope to see it back

Norman (Long Beach, CA):

Being on in the receiving end of a media or general society's depiction of the issue that does not know an awful lot about planes or about the 787, not a lot of information is useful from these sources, one person from MIT as the media claims the 787 might not get back into production or service until 2014 and sometimes the news from the sources of the product may not be fully forthcoming (in some instances, not here) as the situation is being reviewed, investigated and fixed. I do have hope that the 787 will be back in the air as soon it is safely possible.

Rob (Vancouver, Canada):

Hi Randy,

Could you or one of your readers tell me how many batteries along with the weight and size is saved on the 787 by using the Lithium Ion battery compared to the other type of batteries presently used in aircraft like the 747 or 777.

From what I understand it is not as simple as changing over to a different type of battery system that won't give you those same savings and the extra power needed to operate the 787 electric systems.

Good luck for a quick resolve. Looking forward to your updates.


Steve Beach (Amityville, NY GKN Aerospace):

I'm very interested in this topic.......I think many of us are interested in the topic. Please post updates or any findings as they unfold. Thanks, and keep up the great work. We love your blog Randy !

lax town car service (http://blimos.com/lax-car-service.php):

Could you or one of your readers tell me how many batteries along with the weight and size is saved on the 787 by using the Lithium Ion battery compared to the other type of batteries presently used in aircraft like the 747 or 777.

car service to lax (http://www.blimos.com):

From what I understand it is not as simple as changing over to a different type of battery system that won't give you those same savings and the extra power needed to operate the 787 electric systems.

daniel albert (goldbar wa):

I ran many experiments with these batteries while attending MIT, i hate to tell you we tried a cooling process with ceramic and it was un-successful.Of the 20 or so ideas my team came up with, the only one that had great results was my use of a liquid cooled polimer gel.I can help you fix this problem if you contact me.

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