March 2014 Archives

A great blend

I wanted to share more photos of a head-turning livery showcasing the partnership between Boeing and Ryanair. This Next-Generation 737-800 blends the colors and logos of Boeing and our customer. The airplane is one of nearly 300 737-800s currently in Ryanair’s all-Boeing fleet.

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The airline ordered an additional 175 of the airplanes at last year’s Paris Air Show. We’re proud of this special livery and our partnership that keeps getting stronger. All photos courtesy of Geert de Jong/CheeseWorks.

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FIDAE 2014

SANTIAGO - Hello from Chile, where I’m wrapping up a few days at the FIDAE Air Show. Before I talk about my trip here, I want to say how excited we are about ANA’s big commitment for 40 of our twin-aisle airplanes. That includes 20 777-9Xs, 14 787-9s and 6 777-300ERs.

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The 777-9X in ANA livery.

On the single-aisle side, we also got news today that Japan Transocean Air committed to buy 12 Next-Generation 737-800s. Those airplanes will be part of the airline’s fleet renewal program for its existing 737 Classics.

Of course, single-aisle airplanes are the big story back here in Latin America—expected to make up more than 80 percent of new deliveries in the next two decades. But we’re also in active campaigns for our widebodies. As a whole, we forecast that Latin America will need 2,900 new airplanes valued at $300 billion. And while this region is ultra competitive, we know our products like the new 737 MAX will be up for the challenge.

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“Life is a great adventure.” One of the billboards at FIDAE showcasing the 737 MAX.

I’ll leave you with some of the images from the FIDEA Air Show.

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GOL shows off a Next-Generation 737-800. The airline has also ordered 60 of our 737 MAXs.

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The beautiful sky interior of GOL’s 737-800.

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We welcomed U.S. Ambassador to Chile, Michael A. Hammer (center), to the Boeing Booth at FIDAE.

Countdown to Kenya Airways' first 787

We’re excited about the upcoming 787 delivery to Kenya Airways. Over the past few days, the airplane has been in the skies over Puget Sound and looks stunning in the “Pride of Africa” livery.

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The first 787 for Kenya Airways.

This delivery will be the first of nine 787s Kenya Airways has on order. After taking its first ever 777-300ER last year, the airline is also set to add an additional two 777-300ERs to its fleet in the coming months.

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This string of deliveries from Boeing is all part of the airline’s “Project Mawingu” 10 year plan, which will see the East African carrier more than double its fleet size from 44 airplanes to 107 by 2021— and destinations from the current 62 to 115.

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The 787s joining Kenya Airways fleet will enable the airline to increase capacity, add new destinations and increase frequencies to destinations such as Paris and Amsterdam from its hub in Nairobi. Check out the video below showcasing the airplane’s interior.

I’m sure passengers will love flying on this airplane as Kenya Airways sets out on its mission to connect Africa to the world, and the world to Africa.

I’ll end by thanking another customer in that part of the world—as South Africa’s Comair Limited announced an order this week for eight 737 MAXs. It’s the first 737 MAX order announcement from an African operator.

Joint review of 787

In January 2013, Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Ray Conner stood with U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and the Federal Aviation Administration’s Michael Huerta to announce a joint review of the critical systems of the 787. That review is now complete and confirms that the 787 meets its intended high level of safety.

The report discusses findings that are “typical of a new airplane model entering service.” It makes recommendations for how to deal with these findings, as well as several recommendations to help the FAA better deal with its role in certifying new technologies.

We’ve been transparent with the issues we have had on the 787 program. It’s not easy to bring a new business model, new technologies and a new airplane to the market. But these challenges and complexities have not compromised our commitment to safety. That is our top priority and always will be.

Boeing has already implemented many of the report’s recommendations. We’ve learned some important lessons, made the changes to address them and will continue to do so going forward.

We’re grateful for the efforts of those at the FAA and Boeing who worked on the joint review, and for their recommendations about how we can further improve our processes. And we appreciate the review’s confirmation of the strength of the processes used to design and certify the 787.

Room to grow

The sound of sledgehammers rang out at Boeing Field today, marking the start of a significant project for us and our customers. We’re expanding our 737 Delivery Center in Seattle, at a time when we’re seeing unprecedented demand for the world’s best-selling airplane.

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737 VP & General Manager Beverly Wyse takes the first ceremonial swing as we make way for an expanded 737 Delivery Center in Seattle. Jim Anderson photo.

When the expansion is completed in mid-2015, the enhanced delivery center will be more than double the size of the existing facility. It will come complete with three covered jetways—one more than our huge new delivery center in Everett.

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Here’s what the expanded delivery center will look like.

The expanded 737 Delivery Center will not only give our airline customers a world-class facility to pick up their new airplanes, but it will give us the room we need as the 737 program continues to increase production rates. The first airplane at the new rate of 42 per month will roll out of the Renton factory in just a few days—with another rate increase to 47 per month in 2017.

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Customers will be greeted by a world-class facility.

So you see, today’s ceremonial start of construction wasn’t about knocking down part of the past. It was about building our future.

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Leaders from Boeing, SPEEA, IAM 751 and local government mark the ceremonial start of construction on the expanded 737 Delivery Center in Seattle. Marian Lockhart photo.

Keys to success

Last week, a first-time customer for the 777-300ER took home its first airplane. China Southern still has nine more 777-300ER deliveries to go as part of its network expansion plans.

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Ready for delivery— China Southern’s first 777-300ER.

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China Southern’s first 777-300ER takes off from Paine Field in Everett.

Two other new customers of the 777-300ER, China Airlines and China Eastern, are also taking delivery of their first airplane in 2014.

The 777-300ER will be a key part of our transition from the 777 to the new 777X. In just the past three years, we’ve sold 270 777-300ERs, including the historic order for 50 from Emirates. The airplane is in a market of its own when it comes to efficiency and reliability. And after transitioning production from the Next-Generation 737 to the new 737 MAX, we’re confident we can do the same thing with the 777-300ER and the 777X.

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The new 777X.

Unlike the future competition, the 777-300ER is available for delivery much sooner. We fully expect that customers flying older 777s will look to replace them with new 777-300ERs. Other customers will no doubt pair orders for the 777X with the 777-300ER. And as the air cargo market starts to make a comeback, don’t forget about the 777 Freighter.

We have a lot of tools we can use to make this transition successful. I expect the 777-300ER to continue its own success story for a long time to come. Check out the new video below that really showcases the 777.

 

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