May 2014 Archives

Double dose of good news

On the same day the first 787-9 for Air New Zealand took its first flight, we got more great news for the 787 program.

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The first 787-9 set for delivery takes its first flight today in Everett.

The FAA approved 330-minute ETOPS for 787-8s, meaning the airplanes can now operate up to 330 minutes from a landing field.

This is important news for our customers as they look to expand their 787 operations, flying straighter routes between key cities around the world and opening up new routes. It’s also good for the environment—saving thousands of pounds of fuel and cutting carbon emissions.

As we continue working toward 787-9 certification, we expect it to include 330-minute ETOPS operations as well—but that will be up to the FAA. The same holds true for the 787-10.

Improving reliability and increasing our customer base. That’s what we’re focused on—and 330 ETOPS gives us that added boost.

Landing in Latvia

It’s always fun to watch the reaction of people when they see their first 747. More and more people are getting that experience these days, as our new 747-8 just began service to its 150th airport.

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A 747-8 Freighter operated by Atlas Air receives a water cannon salute after landing at Riga International Airport in Latvia. All photos courtesy of Riga Airport.

A 747-8 Freighter operated by Atlas Air touched down at Riga International Airport in Latvia last week. Achieving the 150 airport milestone only 31 months after going into service is truly a testament to the design and capabilities of the airplane. The A380 operates to roughly 30 airports, depending on the season.

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We’re also seeing some other good news for the 747-8 Freighter. When it comes to the cargo market, volume has increased a little over 4 percent since this time last year, and we expect it to continue to pick up as world trade growth moves forward.

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69 of our 747-8s have been delivered so far. The fleet is performing well in service, with a dispatch reliability of 98.9 percent. And best of all, our customers love the airplane. We look forward to seeing it at even more airports down the road.

The Big 4-0

Yesterday, we announced a major milestone for the 737 MAX program as we surpassed 2,000 total orders. Today, we’ve reached another big milestone for the MAX—40 total customers.

Nok Air has now finalized an order for seven MAX 8s and eight 737-800s. The airline plans to convert one of those NG orders to MAX at a later date. With this Nok Air deal going on the books, the 737 MAX now has 2,017 orders from 40 customers.

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The 737 MAX 8 and Next-Generation 737-800 in Nok Air livery.

From my days in Sales, I can tell you the depth and breadth of an airplane’s customer base is critical to its long term success. 40 customers at this stage in the program is a really big deal. It speaks to the acceptance of the MAX from a truly global customer base. And it shows just how well the MAX family is filling the needs of every airline’s business model—from low cost carriers to heritage carriers.

We’re sharing the MAX story with even more customers, and look forward to many more joining the family.

2,000 and counting

The 737 MAX is officially the fastest selling airplane in Boeing history. Today, we announced that the MAX has topped 2,000 orders (2,010 to be exact) from 39 customers around the world.

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The 737 MAX 8.

Each and every one of those customers have played a huge part in the success of the MAX. And some of them were kind enough to share their reasons for investing in this airplane.

United - Ron Baur, vice president of fleet: “We have a lot of faith in Boeing and the 737 MAX, especially that this will be the aircraft of the future for United Airlines.”

Air Lease Corporation - Steven Udvar-Hazy, chairman and CEO: “The 737 MAX provides the best in-class combination of fuel-efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort that our airline clients need to compete in the future.”

GOL - Paulo Kakinoff , CEO: “The 737 MAX will help us lead the way with a modern and safe fleet and help us sustain our competitive advantage. It will give our airline great fuel efficiency and low costs, and will give our passengers a fantastic experience.”

Virgin Australia : “The Boeing 737 has formed a critical part of the Virgin Australia fleet over the past decade thanks to its reliability, comfort and fuel efficiency. The Boeing 737 MAX will build on this, enabling us to achieve strong on time performance and maintain our low cost base. One of the key advantages of the Boeing 737 MAX is that it should reduce fuel burn and CO2 emissions by 14 percent over today’s most fuel-efficient single-aisle aircraft. The aircraft will also feature the light and spacious Boeing Sky Interior and incorporate the latest quiet engine technology, reducing its noise footprint significantly.”

Since the launch of the MAX, we’ve made the airplane even better. See how in this video.

We’re busy in our Renton factory making room for the MAX and on track to start production in mid-2015, fly the airplane in 2016 and deliver it in the third quarter of 2017. In the meantime, here’s a look back in photos at just some of the ways we got to 2,000 orders.

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Here’s me at the launch of the 737 MAX in August 2011. Five airlines made commitments for 496 airplanes.

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Lion Air commits to buy 201 MAX airplanes, November 2011.

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A full scale model of the 737 MAX Advanced Technology Winglet was on display at the 2012 Farnborough Airshow. The MAX racked up 308 orders and commitments during the week of the show.

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The MAX surpasses 1,000 total orders with an order from Aviation Capital Group in December 2012.

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The 737 MAX 7 is launched with an order from Southwest, May 2013.

O Canada!

I just wanted to congratulate Air Canada for taking delivery of their first 787 and flying it home to Toronto over the weekend.

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Air Canada’s first 787, just after it rolled out of the paint hangar in Everett.

Air Canada is the first Canadian airline to fly the Dreamliner, and the airplane will play a key role in their international expansion.

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Air Canada’s first Dreamliner takes to the skies.

Air Canada will use the 787 on its Toronto-Tel Aviv routes, as well as launch a new destination - Tokyo’s Haneda Airport. The 787 also launches the airline’s new International Business Class Cabin. You can check out the interior photos here.

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Air Canada’s first 787 Dreamliner lands and receives a water cannon salute at Toronto’s Pearson Airport on Sunday. Courtesy of Air Canada.

You can check out a video of the airplane landing in Toronto below.

Joining the family

We’re always excited to introduce a new 787 operator. Today, Neos became the first airline in Italy to announce it will fly the Dreamliner. Neos will lease two 787-8s from International Lease Finance Corporation.

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Italy already plays a key role in the production of the 787, with Boeing supplier Alenia Aermacchi’s factories in Grottaglie (Taranto), Foggia and Pomigliano (Naples) producing the central fuselage and horizontal stabilizer for the Dreamliner. In fact, the 787 Dream Tour made a stop in Taranto back in May of 2012.

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The Dream Tour airplane makes a stop in Italy to visit our suppliers in 2012.

While we welcome Neos as a future 787 operator, the 787 program is in the middle of a very busy year. This year alone, 12 more customers will take delivery of their first Dreamliner. It’s an amazing fact— and exciting to see so many liveries coming out of our factories.

The 787s for Neos will expand the Milan-based carrier’s route options starting in 2018. Congratulations and welcome to the 787 family.

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Intergalactic

We talk a lot about the passenger experience here at Boeing. It’s something we take a great deal of pride in, whether it be the Boeing Sky Interior or plans for the next big “wow” factor with the 777X interior.

But those of us on the Commercial side of the business are also working with our colleagues on the Defense and Space side for a “One Boeing” approach to space travel.

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We’ve unveiled a new commercial interior for our Crew Space Transportation (CST-100) next-generation manned space capsule, showing how people other than NASA astronauts may one day travel to space.

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CST-100 mockup in Houston.

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Boeing and partner Bigelow Aerospace highlighted the commercial interior of the capsule it is developing for NASA, while Bigelow showcased its BA 330 commercial space habitat.

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Bigelow Aerospace plans to build the first commercial space station to serve as a location for both scientific research and tourism in low-Earth orbit.

Engineers from across Boeing drew from the company’s decades of experience in commercial and government aerospace to design the capsule’s interior. With Boeing Sky Interior lighting, a familiar daytime blue sky scene helps passengers maintain their connection with Earth.

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Seats are collapsible to facilitate mobility. And there’s a large viewing space to the outside, connecting passengers to the flying experience.

CST-100, developed as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative, is designed to transport up to seven crew members or a mix of crew and cargo to low Earth orbit destinations such as the International Space Station and a planned Bigelow station. Maybe not intergalactic, but definitely out of this world. I’d like to congratulate everyone working on this project, including a shout out to Rachelle Ornan on our Marketing team.

The driver's seat

HONG KONG - Hello from China, where I took part in ISTAT Asia this week. And what better place to talk about airplanes since the Asia Pacific region is driving global aviation growth.

A whopping 100 million new airline passengers will pass through this region each year. That’s just one reason we project Asia Pacific will need 12,820 new airplane valued at $1.9 trillion over the next two decades. 69 percent of those new deliveries will be for single-aisle airplanes, and rest assured that our sales team is hard at work talking with our customers about the 737 MAX.

China itself accounts for about 16 percent of the total demand in the region. In fact, more than 50 percent of all the commercial jets operating in China are Boeing airplanes.

The 777 plays a huge role in this region. Half of all 777 flights operate to and from Asia— and the 777 is used for more than 50 percent of flights longer than 8,000km.

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And the market recognizes the 777’s advantage. Since the first A350-1000 order in 2007, the 777-300ER has outsold it 2 to 1.

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I’ll leave you with a great view of Hong Kong that I took from the Ritz-Carlton, as well as some delicious cuisine.

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Models of success

The 787’s largest airline customer is now sporting one very large display outside of London’s Heathrow Airport. This week, Etihad Airways debuted three huge 787-9 Dreamliner models in the middle of a roundabout outside Terminal 4.

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Painted in Etihad’s livery, the models are 31 feet long and part of a new permanent installation developed by the airline and Boeing. It will greet more than 6 million passengers a year and showcase the 787 at one of the world’s busiest airports.

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Etihad takes delivery of its first 787 later this year. The airline has 41 787-9s and 30 787-10s on order.

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Chris Robshaw, captain of the England national rugby team and of the Etihad-sponsored Harlequins rugby team, took part in the unveiling of the 787 models.

 

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