Dream on display

The third Dreamliner ever built, ZA003, will always be part of some special memories for me. That airplane was the very first 787 I ever flew on during the opening leg of the Dream Tour to China.

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ZA003 takes off for the first leg of the Dream Tour in December 2011. Marian Lockhart photo.

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Inside the flight deck of ZA003 during the Dream Tour.

That’s why it’s so special to see ZA003 find its permanent home at Seattle’s Museum of Flight. We donated the airplane to the museum during a special ceremony this past weekend, where more than 10,000 people toured the airplane on Saturday and Sunday. We’re excited that our first 787 donation is here in the Puget Sound where so many of the people who helped design, build and test the Dreamliner can come visit it with their families. Enjoy this video and the photos below—and here’s hoping this exhibit will capture the imaginations of future aviators.

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ZA003 prepares for its short journey from our Boeing Field flightline to the Museum of Flight. Jim Anderson photo.

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The tip of ZA003’s wing lights up the early morning hours. Jim Anderson photo.

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In the still of the night. Jim Anderson photo.

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A perfect sunny Saturday in Seattle. Marian Lockhart photo.

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787 Vice President and General Manager Larry Loftis (right) hands the ceremonial keys for ZA003 to Museum of Flight President and CEO Doug King. Marian Lockhart photo.

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The 787 team presents artificats from the airplane’s history to the museum. Marian Lockhart photo.

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Window to the future. One of the many children who toured the airplane on Saturday. Marian Lockhart photo.

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Bill Boeing, Jr. and his wife June at the ceremony. Marian Lockhart photo.

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Thanks to everyone who came out on Saturday. Marian Lockhart photo.

Comments (2)

Nick Johnson (Orcas, WA):

The 787 is the most innovative commercial aircraft since the 707, as well as a beautiful flying machine. Its troubled development reminds me of the story of the Sydney Opera House, which was also plagued by cost overruns and schedule delays. The architect was fired, but has since been recognized for his creation of a world renowned icon.

I hope the 787's creator Mike Bair, who was also replaced due to cost overruns and schedule delays, will eventually receive recognition as the father of this iconic aircraft.

Norman Garza (Long Beach, CA):

The 787 still has a lot of power in the market to link the large but non primary cities in China to Europe, Australia, Africa and North America, particularly the Model 8 and 9. It is not that often a very new plane like the 787 goes to a museum. It would make a fine addition, especially for those who don't have the opportunity to fly in one and for those who are not mechanics or air side workers who will never stand close to one.

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