Welding, well done

I’m excited to show off some more progress on our massive 777X Composite Wing Center in Everett. Construction on the first autoclave to support wing production is almost finished.

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An aerial photograph of the autoclave worksite shows the complete autoclave vessel, formerly three separate towers, now welded into one piece.

The first of three autoclaves, measuring 28 feet wide by 120 feet long, is being built at a site adjacent to Paine Field near the Everett factory. The autoclave was initially built vertically in 13 sections, called cans. The cans were then assembled into three towers measuring 40 feet tall.

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Project manager Larry Englund stands at the autoclave construction site in Everett, Wash. Behind him sits one autoclave tower in its original, vertical configuration; the other autoclave tower has already been turned to its side, ready for further welding.

Recently, the towers were turned on their sides and welded together to create the autoclave vessel. Welding is now nearly finished, with testing to follow.

The autoclave vessel is the star of the process, but it can function only with an equally large and impressive support system of electrical, air, vacuum and pressure lines, equipment and tooling.

Later this year, the autoclave will be transported to the Composite Wing Center, a 1.3-million square foot facility that will be roughly the size of 25 football fields.

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A rendering of what the autoclaves will look like inside the 777X Composite Wing Center.

It really is amazing to watch all of the construction progress in Everett. And we can’t wait to start building the 777X.

Comments (8)

James Baloun (Sunnyvale, California, USA):

Just wondering if an autoclave could be made with multiple stages so that the high pressure atmosphere being removed could be used to partially recharge the next cycle and save a fraction of the pumping and heating cost? This reminds me of the new locks in the Panama Canal that will use some of the upper lock water to lift the lower lock.

Also while the autoclave was reloading the process parts the second stage could be preparing the next cycle. This might reduce cycle time.

Chris Ruiz (Monterrey, NL, Mexico):

Can't wait to see the new wing and the new 777X. I wish you at Boeing all the best!

Yvon (SLC Utah):

Amazing how in the aerial shot, the people are little blips, it really shows the enormity of this new plane. What makes the 777x different from the normal 777? Is it going to be bigger, or more luxurious? In any case it looks like a fun project to work on.

Yvon Lebras | http://www.weld-techproducts.com

Norman Garza (Long Beach, CA):

The 777-9 is going to be an amazing plane but the new wings are what the new plane is about.

Ty Kennedy (Brisbane, Australia):

This is really a huge project and I definitely can relate to your excitement about its progress. Seeing how things go the way it is supposed to be really provides a sense of accomplishment. Can't wait to see the final output! Great job guys!

mobile welding brisbane

jake:

Recently, the towers were turned on their sides and welded together to create the autoclave vessel. Welding is now nearly finished, with testing to follow. jake

Jason:

The scale of this project is impressive. Hard to even picture what a space that is the size of 25 football fields would look like. The Tool Report

Mike (usa):

Great project, I am blown away at with boeing has been able to accomplish with their plasma cutter reviews. Do you think they will be able to make it grow again in the future?

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