Firming things up

The 777X team reached a key milestone this week with the completion of firm configuration for the 777-9, the first member of the 777X family. The team reached this milestone after years of collaboration with customers and suppliers to make sure we had the optimal configuration for the airplane.

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777X can now be seen on the belly of the airplane.

You may have noticed that we dropped the “X” in our minor model designations. While it’s still the 777X family, we’ll now refer to the minor models as the 777-8 and 777-9. This naming convention keeps us consistent with minor model designations across the Boeing family.

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The 777X name has built tremendous equity and industry recognition since its launch in 2013. The 777 stands for efficiency, passenger appeal, flagship status for airlines and industry leading reliability. Combining 777 with the “X” means taking all of those great attributes to a new level.

Reaching firm configuration was truly a team effort—with our people setting up the 777X program for future success. Congrats to all involved.

Comments (6)

Manos (Greece):

Congrats too from me to everyone involved in the 777X program! The acclaimed achievements are to be proven through flight testing, but -please- no more 10 abreast configurations in economy class! Passengers' satisfaction is so (if no "more") significant as airliners' one, especially on long and ultra long range routes!
But, apart from the above, well done to all of you!!!

Paulo M (Johannesburg, RSA):

This is awesome, looking forward to this program lifting off the ground. Before it flies though, I'm eagerly awaiting developments from key suppliers, and here General Electric's GE9X is tops. Also, looking forward to what sort of changes come to Boeing's Signature Interior - this aircraft will be the key ambassador of Boeing's passenger experience. And that role is growing in importance judging from some of the recent high-profile 777-300ER deliveries - such as China Airlines.

Andrew Boydston (Boise ID USA):

Even though the 777X program will not have the shock and awe of what the 787 program did back in 2007. The sum of all its parts is a bold statement for aviation. The 777X has found the Goldilocks place for Jumbos. Not too big or too small, but spaced comfortably for 350-400 passengers. The 777X will match well with airports born out of the demand factor from traffic. Boeing waited for the market to define itself before launching the right aircraft for its time.

Congratulations Boeing for letting the market define the product and not succumbing to the arrogance of building something so huge, the market cannot adapt without infrastructure rebuilding. Two 777X coming in from two different places in the world, out preforms anything flying for its passengers, even what one mega coach could do A-380 after an airport is rebuilt for millions of $dollars.

launchvehicle 2015 (Plainfield, NH):

Congratulations!

AvWeek has this piece giving the max pax/range and the max range/pax for each variant.

http://aviationweek.com/commercial-aviation/boeing-hits-777x-firm-configuration-design-milestone

I am wondering, will they also have freight capacities in addition to max pax and all luggage? Thx.

Eric Ghassaban Kjellén (Gothenburg, Sweden):

Hi Randy! Warm congratulations to you, the company and most of all the 777/777X team for continued progress and now this reached milestone on what we can finally call the 777-8 and the 777-9. It's hard to believe that you have managed to improve on the most successful family of widebody airliners of all time (among which, incidentially, the 777-300ER is my favorite airliner of every category) but from the looks of the bird and from the looks of the numbers, you seem to have done it.

Again, greetings to Seattle from one of your greatest fans in the world. I'll let my keychain say the rest of what needs to be said: http://i.imgur.com/0UO4imK.jpg

Norman Garza (Long Beach, CA):

the 777X is going to be a great start to the next decade. It makes a logical successor to the 747-400s that are left, the last of the A340-600s and early 777-300ERs as well a a successor to the A380s that would be deemed to large of an aircraft for the markets it now serves.

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