September 2015 Archives

Factory time lapse

Watching a Boeing airplane being built inside one of our factories is always an impressive sight. But seeing one assembled from start to finish is truly must-see t.v.

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The first 787-9 for British Airways arrives at London Heathrow.

We put together the time lapse video below for British Airways to document its first 787-9 going through the Everett factory. The airplane, which arrived today at London Heathrow, is the first of 22 787-9s the airline will receive. Enjoy!

Jumbo-sized decal

There’s nothing quite like getting out on the road and meeting with our airline customers face to face. Today on a beautiful morning, I had the pleasure of seeing Cargolux’s newest 747-8 Freighter join the fleet at its home base in Luxembourg.

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Cargolux’s newest 747-8 Freighter arrives with a special livery in Luxembourg.

This delivery was all the more special as the airplane featured a light-hearted decal, which took a comic approach to Cargolux’s slogan “You name it, we fly it.”

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The airplane rolling out of the Everett paint hangar. Moa Sigurdardotti photos.

Created by Belgian cartoonist Philippe Cruyt, the decal was commissioned to celebrate Cargolux’s 45th anniversary of operations. It showcases the airline’s ability to carry unusual and oversized cargo using the unique capabilities of the 747-8 Freighter, with a strong dash of humor and just a little artistic license.

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This was the largest decal Boeing has ever applied to an airplane and consisted of 460 individual parts.

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I think the photos from today speak for themselves, but I want to say a huge congratulations to Cargolux on its latest delivery and its 45th anniversary. And hats off to the team in Everett for pulling off this feat. Check out more photos on the Cargolux Facebook page.

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Here’s me speaking with some of the media gathered for the airplane’s arrival in Luxembourg.

Tanker first flight

I want to congratulate the team in Everett after Boeing and the U.S. Air Force made aviation history on Friday when the KC-46A tanker aircraft completed its inaugural flight. It took off from Paine Field and landed four hours later at Boeing Field.

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During the flight, Boeing test pilots performed operational checks on engines, flight controls and environmental systems— and took the tanker to a maximum altitude of 35,000 feet prior to landing.

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The Boeing team will now conduct a post-flight inspection and calibrate instrumentation prior to the next series of flights, during which the tanker boom and WARPs systems will be deployed. Before the end of the year, the KC-46 will begin conducting aerial refueling flights with a number of U.S. Air Force aircraft.

MAX on the move

There are a lot of new “firsts” to share today from our Renton factory. Final assembly of the very first 737 MAX is now underway—on our brand new third final assembly line.

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Mechanics have attached the wings to the body of the first 737 MAX.

Wing-to-body join is now complete. And as you can see, those wings feature our new Advanced Technology winglets. Designed exclusively for the MAX, they’ll give our airline customers up to 1.8 percent additional fuel-efficiency improvement over today’s inline winglet designs.

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An overhead view of the first 737 MAX in final assembly.

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A close up look at Boeing’s new Advanced Technology winglets. The winglet on the left is the first production AT winglet for airplane 1 and the winglet on the right is a test article.

We remain on track to roll out this first 737 MAX by the end of the year and fly it in early 2016. Launch customer Southwest Airlines is scheduled to take delivery in the third quarter of 2017.

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The force is strong with this one

Congratulations to our friends at ANA as they rolled out their R2-D2™ ANA Jet today in Everett. The entire world got a chance to see this spectacular event via a live webcast.

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On October 18, this 787-9 is scheduled to go into service on international routes, initially between Tokyo and Vancouver, and then fly between Japan and other cities in ANA’s international network including the U.S. (Seattle and San Jose), Europe (Munich, Paris and Brussels), Australia (Sydney), China (Beijing) and Indonesia (Jakarta).

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Getting better every day

More than 22 years after we first launched the 767 Freighter, the airplane continues to make headlines. This week, we announced the 767 production rate would increase to 2.5 airplanes per month in the fourth quarter of 2017.

It comes just a couple of months after FedEx ordered 50 additional 767 Freighters, the largest single order for any version of the 767 in program history.

It’s no wonder this airplane keeps making news—because we keep making it better. We continue to invest in both the production line and the airplane because it’s filling a unique segment in the marketplace and providing value to our customers. Earlier this year, we introduced an engine performance improvement package (PIP) that will provide an additional 0.5 percent fuel efficiency improvement.

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Inside the 767 factory in Everett. Gail Hanusa photo.

Our friends at WestJet recently received their first 767-300ER, one of four the airline will soon deploy from Alberta to Hawaii, between Toronto and Montego Bay, Jamaica, and for the launch of WestJet’s new service to London Gatwick in May 2016.

The 767 program has a healthy backlog extending midway into the next decade, and sales campaigns are ongoing.

I know the 767 is a personal favorite for many travelers, and continues to be a favorite among our cargo customers. Congratulations to everyone on the program for their hard work.

Triple 777 delivery

Here’s something that hasn’t happened in 15 years. On Wednesday, Boeing and Emirates celebrated the simultaneous delivery of three 777s — two 777-300ERs and one 777 Freighter.

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Emirates’ three 777s are positioned at the Everett Delivery Center. Colleen Pfeilschiefter photo.

The triple delivery also marked the entry of the 150th 777 into Emirates’ fleet.

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Elizabeth Lund, vice president and general manager of the 777 program, celebrates the triple delivery of 777s to Emirates with members of the airline. Colleen Pfeilschiefter photo.

Emirates is the world’s largest 777 operator and the only airline ever to operate all six of the 777 variants.

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One of Emirates’ newly delivered 777-300ERs takes off Wednesday from Everett on its way to Dubai. Colleen Pfeilschiefter photo.

We’re proud to mark this special day with Emirates and thank them for their partnership through the years.

Mega-cities myth

You’ve probably heard the argument from Airbus that mega-cities will fuel greater demand for the A380. To put it simply, they claim very big cities need very big airplanes to deal with all the passenger traffic.

Here’s one more example of why that theory doesn’t add up.

Tokyo is a HUGE city. Its metro population (about 36 million) is larger than the entire population of Canada (about 35 million). Tokyo is served by Haneda and Narita airports. It should be the classic example of the Airbus mega-city theory.

But the A380 only flies in and out of Tokyo with a whopping 6 flights per day.

On the other hand, the 787 is being used for about 150 flights per day in and out of Tokyo. In fact, 11 airlines are flying the Dreamliner on 49 unique city pairs.

The chart below shows that Northeast Asia’s airports have seen continued growth, driven by new markets and more frequencies. Over the past 10 years, the number of destinations has soared—while the average seats per flight dropped (meaning smaller airplanes are being used instead of very large ones).

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In today’s world, travelers are demanding more frequency with more point-to-point options. And that’s exactly what the 787 delivers.

 

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