From the runway-- to the fairway

Speed, weight and drag are just a few of the concepts our engineers work with every day when designing Boeing airplanes. These same principles also apply to golf club designers.

So it made a lot of sense when Callaway asked a group of Boeing engineers to collaborate on the design of the company’s newest driver, the XR 16.

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In particular, Callaway leaned on Boeing’s expertise in laminar flow control. They were able to strategically place what we call local air flow modifiers— or trip steps— on the club head to help reduce drag from the top of the swing through impact with the golf ball.

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In addition to helping create a new product, the Boeing team was able to collaborate with Callaway on an entirely different kind of research and development process. Now that’s what I call a hole in one!

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Boeing and Callaway engineers trade ideas.

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Learn more about laminar flow and how it applies to golf in our video below.

Comments (3)

James Satterberg (Renton, Wa):

So we are missing some of the story here...
Tripping the Air will lead to more head speed...
Which translates to greater distance...

But how much more distance?

Jack Lomento (Las Vegas, NV. 89134):

It is great that Callaway thought outside the box and used Boeings knowledge of aerodynamics and airflow to make a superior Golf Club very smart.

Norman Garza (Long Beach, CA):

I'm sure it's going for a pretty penny for a good distance but it can turn novice players to pros on those long drives.

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