February 2016 Archives

Scoot-i-tude

I wanted to share some photos during my time at the recent Singapore Airshow, where I got a dose of “Scoot-i-tude.” That’s the positive attitude reflected by our friends at Scoot who showed off one of their 787s at the show.

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The Scoot 787 at the Singapore Airshow.

It was great to see the excitement and passion that people have for the airline. As I walked around the show dressed in one of Scoot’s bright yellow shirts, I got a thumbs up from folks who mistook me for an airline employee.

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Here’s me with Scoot’s CEO Campbell Wilson.

What was most impressive is the job that Scoot did with their 787-9. It shows just how flexible the airplane can be, allowing airlines to operate and configure it for their business model.

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Inside the Scoot 787.

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Me with Scoot’s flight attendants.

It was also interesting to see so many airlines from outside the region come to Singapore for the show. Thanks to everyone for making the show so memorable.

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The line of Boeing airplane models on display at Singapore.

Epic photo shoot

There aren’t too many photo shoots that I’d call epic. But when it comes to Boeing’s centennial, this may be the time to use that word.

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The very first 727 (left) meets United’s newest 787 on our Everett flightline. Matthew Thompson photo.

This week, we managed to pull off a nose to nose meeting between the newest 787 for United Airlines—and the very first 727 which rolled out in 1962, N7001U, also delivered to United.

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Matthew Thompson photo.

The 727 is in the last stages of its overhaul at the Museum of Flight’s Restoration Center at Paine Field in Everett. In the next few days, it will take one final flight to the museum’s home at Boeing Field to go on permanent display. (Click here to see the 727’s final flight.)

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A closeup of the very first 727 ever built. Patrick Rodwell photo.

We’re proud to be able to join United and the Museum of Flight in this incredible moment on our Everett flightline.

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The newest 787 for United Airlines. Patrick Rodwell photo.

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Patrick Rodwell photo.

BCF leaps to the Next-Generation

This week in Shanghai, our Commercial Aviation Services launched the 737-800 Boeing Converted Freighter program. It came after we secured orders and commitments for up to 55 conversions from seven customers. It’s the first Next-Generation 737 model that Boeing has offered for conversion.

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The 737-800BCF is part of our strategy to significantly grow our services business. It also serves a distinctly different market than the freighter versions of the 747, 767 and 777— and will primarily be used to carry express cargo on domestic routes.

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Launch customers gather for a signing ceremony in Shanghai.

Over the next 20 years, we’re forecasting the need more than 1,000 converted freighters the size of the 737, with China’s domestic air-freight carriers accounting for nearly one-third of the total market.

The first 737-800BCF is expected to be delivered in the fourth quarter of 2017. Congrats to the CAS team on today’s launch. Below are a few fun facts on the 737-800BCF.

Carries up to 52,800 pounds (23.9 metric tons) of cargo on routes of up to 1,995 nautical miles (3,690 kilometers, 2,295 miles).

Twelve pallet positions — 11 standard pallets and one half-pallet — provide 5,000 cubic feet (141.5 cubic meters) of cargo space on the main deck.

Two lower-lobe compartments combine to provide more than 1,540 cubic feet (43.7 cubic meters) of cargo space.

Keeping up with the MAX

The 737 MAX keeps on flying. Since 1A001 took its first flight on Jan. 29, 2016, the airplane has continued a steady stream of testing.

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Pictured here is 1A001 on Jan. 30, 2016 out for its second flight the day after its first— which is highly unusual for a new airplane program. The MAX was busy testing on five of the first six days per plan and has continued this momentum. Kevin Flynn photo.

The team continues to execute on the flight testing plan and prepare for the other three airplanes to enter the flight test fleet soon.

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Pictured here are the other three members of the 737 MAX flight test fleet in various stages of production on the central line in the Renton factory taken a few weeks ago. Jim Anderson photo.

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Pictured here is 1A002, the second MAX, on the Renton flight line. The airplane is painted in the “light” livery for the 737 MAX which features the same tail design and signature brand colors, but a more simplified, leaner design to save time in the paint process and a more rapid transition to test. Jim Anderson photo.

100 and counting

The team at Boeing South Carolina marked a major milestone on Tuesday with the delivery of the 100th 787 to roll out of the North Charleston site. (All photos by Alan Marts.)

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Employees celebrated with representatives from American Airlines—many of them making the trip down from the airline’s Charlotte hub.

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American’s VP of Charlotte hub operations Terri Pope borrowed a quote from American Idol judge Jennifer Lopez by saying the 787 “gives me goosies.”

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Thanks to American and all of our 787 customers for helping us reach this milestone—and congratulations to everyone at Boeing South Carolina.

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Terri Pope (left), VP of Charlotte Hub Operations for American Airlines, and Beverly Wyse, VP and GM of Boeing South Carolina, trade a high 5 after cutting the ribbon on the 100th 787 from the North Charleston site.

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February 9

As we look back on Boeing’s first 100 years during our Centennial celebration, one date really stands out: February 9.

That’s the date three different Boeing airplanes took their first flight: the 727, the 747 and the Next-Generation 737.

No, we don’t deliberately fly airplanes for the first time in the middle of winter. But we sure do love to see them brighten the skies when Seattle weather is the gloomiest.

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First flight of the 727: Feb. 9, 1963

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First flight of the 747: Feb. 9,1969

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First flight of the Next-Generation 737, a 737-700: Feb. 9, 1997

 

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